Look up for the Perseid meteor shower this weekend

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The best time to watch will be on the night of August 12 and the early morning of August 13, especially in the pre-dawn hours.

The shower runs from July 17 to August 24, however, it peaks from 4 pm on August 12 until 4 am on August 13 Eastern Daylight Time.

Anyone who was disappointed by the brightness of the almost full moon obscuring the Perseid meteor shower previous year will have a chance to turn their stargazing luck around this month.

The Perseid Meteor Shower is set to light up the night sky this weekend.

Meteor showers are caused when meteoroids, who were once part of a comet or asteroid, start hitting Earth's atmosphere in streams.

Stargazers are hoping for clear skies this weekend so they can see the Perseids in all their glory.

The Perseids meteor shower is often considered the most spectacular of the year, and this summer's show should be particularly excellent because of the phase of the moon.

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The shooting stars will appear to come from a single point, or "radiant", situated in the constellation Perseus, that climbs higher as the night progresses.

However the spectacular meteor shower also has biblical connotations.

The best time to see the most meteors according to the American Meteor Society tends to be just before dawn, around 4 a.m. local time. For city residents, parks can offer relief from light to watch the streaks.

In fact, you can expect to see between fifty to a hundred meteors an hour in places where the sky is very dark.

But what if you're unable to get to that dark site, or - worse yet - what if your weather is poor? "What happens over time is you get the comet and also this huge debris field which exists spread out along the entire orbit", Twarog said. As the cosmic junk - many the size of a grain of sand - enters the atmosphere, it burns up in a flash, appearing as "shooting stars" across the sky.

Meteor showers are typically visible with the naked eye, so no special equipment is needed, but those in rural areas with minimal light pollution will have a clearer view.

All you'll really need to do is crane your head upwards.

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